Tag Archives: AARP

Prospects for Millennials: What’s Wrong and What Can Be Done

Last month’s National Academy of Social Insurance conference highlighted the grim world Millennials are inheriting. It also gave a platform to some creative solutions that include expanding and creating new social insurance programs. Example: Universal Family Care.

As someone who researches and writes about history, I’m naturally skeptical of the concept of generations. For the most part, “generations” are arbitrary categories that lump together groups of people whose experiences of life are starkly different, muddling our ability to decide the best policies—and politics—for society as a whole.

For “Millennials,” however, I’m inclined to make an exception. The National Academy of Social Insurance made “Regenerating Social Insurance for Millennials and the Millennium” the theme of its annual policy conference at the end of January, and the event made a strong case that this is one generation with distinct needs and a distinct profile.

On the surface, Millennials are still a vastly disparate group. They are the most diverse cohort, ethnically, in American history, Jean Accius, vice president at AARP Public Policy Institute, pointed out in the conference’s opening panel—and this at a time when income and life prospects between racial groups in the U.S. are diverging. But the Academy framed its definition of Millennials—individuals born between 1980 and 2000—in a different and very useful way. What marks them, and colors their lives profoundly, Continue reading Prospects for Millennials: What’s Wrong and What Can Be Done

Enlisting AARP

Social Security will be under attack again in 2015. The best way for progressives to defend it is to go on the offensive as well, pressing Congress to pass one of the four bills now on the table to expand the program. Getting AARP on board would be a big help—but the giant older-Americans’ organization seems in no hurry.

AARP is by far the largest organization representing older Americans, and the most influential. Traditionally, it’s been reluctant to enter into coalitions with more overtly political groups advocating for seniors, presumably to sustain its image as a non-partisan organization. It’s a delicate balancing act, and not always successful, because no matter how moderate its policy positions, Republicans will always regard AARP as only slightly less evil than, say, the Socialist Workers Party.

With its 39 million members, AARP would be an invaluable ally in a 2015 push to expand Social Security. But an editorial by AARP’s CEO, Jo Ann Jenkins, suggests this is not a priority. Continue reading Enlisting AARP

Jon Cowan: Once Again, Ginning Up Faux Youth Outrage

Coming soon: a new pressure group called “The Can Kicks Back,” which aims to turn younger Americans into an anti-deficit avenging army. It will surely attempt to play a role in the post-election talks surrounding the “fiscal cliff.” This offensive bears a slight odor of deja vu, however, because one of its organizers is Jonathan Cowan, who 20 years ago attempted to recruit Gen Xers in a similar campaign propelled by a brash, ultimately buffoonish group called Lead … Or Leave.

Today, Jon Cowan is the president of Third Way, which calls itself “the nation’s leading centrist policy institution” and is certainly one of the most prominent center-right pressure groups in Washington. Its board of trustees reads like a Who’s Who of Wall Street, hedge fund and real estate barons and it enjoys privileged access to Continue reading Jon Cowan: Once Again, Ginning Up Faux Youth Outrage

Has Social Security (Ever) Been “Raided”?

Social Security is always being raided. And some brave person – typically an elected official or someone aspiring to be – is always vowing to stop this outrage before our retirement system is drained to the dregs. That’s just how it is in mad-as-hell America, where righteous indignation comes slickly packaged and accurately defining one’s terms is an unnecessary formality.

“Don’t raid Social Security to reduce nation’s deficit,” pleads the AARP. Meanwhile, right-wing gold bugs are warning us that a “huge pot of U.S. Social Security money” is “vulnerable to being tapped by illegal alien workers.” And over on Capitol Hill, intrepid Sen. Jim DeMint promotes a “Stop the Raid” amendment, protesting that “It’s time for politicians to stop stealing from our seniors to secretly finance trillions in wasteful Washington spending.”

The Great Social Security Raid has become the Sasquatch of American politics: Continue reading Has Social Security (Ever) Been “Raided”?