Tag Archives: The New Yorker

The Meaning of Harry Reid’s Departure

For the last decade, Harry Reid has been a bulwark against efforts by Republicans and members of his own party to send the core of the New Deal achievement down the road to oblivion. Other Democratic lawmakers may be equally committed, but almost none have the same close emotional ties that he possesses to the Rooseveltian state.

When Senate minority leader Harry Reid announced last week that he won’t run for reelection in 2016, the first thing that flashed through my mind was his age: he’s 75. Only nine senators are older than Reid, and only two of them are Democrats. That underscores how few people still serving in the Senate were born during the New Deal, the period that formed the modern US government, with its social protections, administrative apparatus, and (not so happily) military-industrial complex. For the past 35 years, roughly corresponding to Reid’s career in electoral office, the legislation that Washington enacted during the Great Depression has been a war zone, Continue reading The Meaning of Harry Reid’s Departure

Why is “entitlement” such a nasty word?

Since his reelection, President Obama has been talking about “reforming entitlements” every chance he gets –or at least when he’s talking to Republicans. But why – and when – did “entitlement” become such a nasty word?

Since his reelection, the president has been trying hard to have it both ways when it comes to Social Security and Medicare. According to the Huffington Post’s Sabrina Siddiqui, Obama on March 14 assured House Democrats that he won’t “slash” the two programs – moments after a meeting with Senate Republicans at which he reaffirmed his commitment to “reforming” entitlements, including adopting the chained CPI for calculating Social Security and Medicare.

Knowing it was poison to his constituency, Obama had more or less avoided the subject on the campaign trail last year. And as Continue reading Why is “entitlement” such a nasty word?